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The World’s Most Southerly Yacon?

Source: The World’s Most Southerly Yacon?

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Colour Amid the Cold

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Even the coldest summer in 32+ years of having lived in Papatowai could not deter the

glorious gladioli from blooming. Leaving them where they were, however, was to have them

battered by wind and rain so I donned wet weather gear and brought the spikes inside to light

up the living room. A visitor commented that ‘glads’ are now considered a ‘rather old-fashioned’

flower! Perhaps they are and perhaps that makes me old-fashioned, too!

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Must-have this Spring

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If you can have only one addition to your edible garden this year, make it a hybrid berry. I fell in love with these fat jewels when I saw them flaunting themselves in a friend’s garden last summer. My picks (if you’ll pardon the pun) are ‘Thornless Jewel’ and ‘Berry Delight’.

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Winter Sentinels

 

These giving 'souls' are almost picked dry but they have given so gererously over the winter months and all through the snow.

These giving ‘souls’ are almost picked dry

but they have given so generously over the

winter months and all through the snow.

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October is the leanest month …

In the Middle Ages, the months between the end of winter (when all root stores were almost used up) and late spring (when the first new veges were available in the garden) was referred to as ‘the famine months’. It can certainly seem that way as you wait for those first leafy greens to appear. In the meantime, though, we’re dining like kings on stored shallots, garlic, potatoes, carrots, parsnips and yams. We have frozen leeks, spinach, broad beans, peas, coriander and gooseberries, and preserved chutneys and relishes. Fresh from the outdoor garden come chives, parsley, daikon radish, cabbage, kale and rhubarb while in the glasshouse and under plastic cloches outside we have spinach beet and silver beet. Tie it all together with fresh eggs and stored honey and who could want for more! Planning makes perfect and when you live in the deep south, that planning has to be pretty spot on if you’re to live out of your garden. Now if only that lettuce would hurry along …!

Those shallots and garlic are as good as the day they were harvested!

Those shallots and garlic are as good as the day they were harvested!

Kale - the great survivor. We eat ours after grilling it in a flat bed sandwich press - no salt or oil needed to create a crips treat.

Kale – the great survivor. We eat ours after grilling it in a flat bed sandwich press – no salt or oil needed to create a crisp treat.

Banks of parsley are flourishing. They are one of the first 'greens' to burst into life after winter.

Banks of parsley are flourishing. They are one of the first ‘greens’ to burst into life after winter.

Thanks to carrots still in the ground, and coriander from the freezer (it freezes like a dream), we're dining off this delicious, rich soup.

Thanks to carrots still in the ground, and coriander from the freezer (it freezes like a dream), we’re dining off this delicious, rich soup.

Fresh chives, the very first green onion flavour of the season.

Fresh chives, the very first green onion flavour of the season.

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A (free) lunch with a view in Nouméa

Great writing – great inside info.

New Caledonia Today

Photo JH Photo JH

Earlier this week, my son and I dined on a 3-course meal, complete with a cocktail, wine and coffee (okay, I had the cocktail, wine and coffee, while my son reorganised his Pokemon cards). The rooftop restaurant looked out onto the lagoon and my fellow diners were as quiet and as sophisticated as any self-respecting introvert would hope for. Participating in a real-world training exercise for the waiting staff, we enjoyed such atmosphere and fare for the price of “gratuit” (free). The only condition was that we spoke English.

English!

What in the world am I talking about, you ask? Well, I was as surprised as you may be to learn about a programme at a “pedagogical” restaurant, one of the professional training programmes in New Caledonia. This particular institution trains hotel and restaurant staff to become professional waiters and waitresses and young adults to become chefs and…

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Northern New Caledonia: A haven!

Great information. Do you have an email for Malabou Hotel? I can’t locate one on the net.

New Caledonia Today

Photo JH Photo JH

It’s been a while since I’ve been able to post. Such is the way with work, with school holidays, with being caught up in the whirlwind of routine, even in the South Pacific. I do apologise to my regular readers. I have not fallen off the edge of the Earth (though as of late, you will have found me under water) – just busy. I hope to return to my regular weekly posts, as I do missing checking in with you and reporting on life here  (and boy do we have life to report – 3 car accidents this week, taking the life of a 2-year-old and a young fire worker as well as another 33-year-old man; a pronounced move to make the sale of guns that much harder as we’ve had 8 deaths by guns so far this year; and oh yes, bushfires in Koumac and La…

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