October Treasure

The roadside garden has been buffeted for three weeks, now, by gale force winds. ‘Enervating’ doesn’t even describe how exhausting it is to garden in these ghastly conditions. Yesterday, I actually found myself sheltering the shelters covering the silver beet seedlings! But things are growing, all the same: cavelo nero, cone-head cabbages, spinach, coriander and parsley. And broad beans are popping up through the ground. The gooseberry bush is in flower and the rhubarb is covered in fresh green leaves and pretty bright stalks.

Sometime, the passersby who stop to gather food from the garden leave little gifts. Often, it’s a thank you note which I find, sometimes many days later, blown into a bush and covered in delicate dew drops. Once, I found a bottle of beer ‘planted’ in the garden (perfect for hot-day weeding!). Another time, someone popped three packets of seed into my mail box. This week, a treasure appeared when a local farmer deposited a bale of haylage beside the garden. It makes wonderful mulch and is also a great medium in which to grow potatoes. How lucky I am to have such thoughtful neighbours.

On an amusing note, I see that wild honesty has colonised the roadside garden – very appropriate given that the garden is self-regulating and relies on the honesty of those who gather from it to take no more than they require. Clever flower!

Wild honesty flowers in the roadside garden. How fascinating that a flower with this name grows, without help, in a garden that is self-regulating and which relies on honesty!

Wild honesty flowers in the roadside garden. How fascinating that a flower with this name grows, without help, in a garden that is self-regulating and which relies on honesty!

With its plastic bottles sheltering seedlings, the garden resembles a recycling centre.

With its plastic bottles sheltering seedlings, the garden resembles a recycling centre.

A big gift for the roadside garden arrived unexpectedly - a bale of haylage!

A big gift for the roadside garden arrived unexpectedly – a bale of haylage!

Roadside garden in winter (oops, I mean 'spring'!)

Roadside garden in winter (oops, I mean ‘spring’!)

These plastic shelters hunker down in their own protective trough of soil.

These plastic shelters hunker down in their own protective trough of soil.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under THE ROADSIDE GARDEN

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s